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“I have lived in more than 15 houses throughout five countries in my lifetime”

Thew Arnott recently expanded its technical support team with the addition of Verity Clifton as applications technologist. A food technology graduate, Clifton was previously with Tate & Lyle and has also had experience working with Campden BRI. Here, she explains why companies with a strong brand loyalty who are stepping into the free-from and dietary restricted alternatives markets will be the ones to watch.

Describe yourself in three words.

Approachable, creative, individual.

What’s your biggest professional achievement?

I haven’t achieved it yet, as there will always be bigger things to achieve. I hope to run my own development team; I have a lot of drive to encourage new technologists into the industry.

How did you get to where you are today?

With a lot of self-assessment. I initially thought I would go into pharmacology development or pharmacy and possibly enter the military, but decided it wasn’t the right choice for me. I went into food technology at Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. While there I completed a placement year with Campden BRI and was able to move between departments. After graduating, I spent four and a half years with Tate & Lyle in its speciality food ingredients team.

What does a typical day look like for you?

I always start my day with a cup of tea and breakfast, then work, which is different most days. Typically, I will be keeping contact with our customers, relaying information and suggesting the right raw materials for their purpose. I am often in the applications kitchen running pilot samples, or producing training programmes. During the evening I am usually training at my local rock climbing centre, as I try to keep an active lifestyle.

What have been the highlights of your company’s history, in your opinion?

The move from being traders to manufacturers, and the opening of the Deeside, UK site.

What is your pet hate?

When items are not put back where they were taken from.

Give us a positive prediction for the food industry over the next 12 months.

We are seeing increased consumer desire to learn more about what is in food. If the correct information is provided to the public, this could be a help for the food industry. By having a better understanding of what is in food, consumers will be able to make more informed choices.

What do you consider to be the most important attributes for a leader?

A leader should be able and willing to share their faults with their team. They should also be able to explain how they overcame or utilised their faults to their advantage.

Who do you most admire?

Amelia Earhart – although she is of course most famous for her trip across the Atlantic Ocean, her accomplishments in aviation paved the way for female aviation, equality for women pilots and the women’s movement.

Which people/organisations or companies are the ones to watch right now?

Any mainstream companies with a strong brand loyalty who are stepping into the free-from and dietary restricted alternatives markets will be the ones to watch, especially restaurants.

Which words do you most overuse?

Like.

If you weren’t in your current position, what else might you be doing?

Either teaching or in a research position in new technologies.

Tell us something about yourself that few people know.

I have lived in more than 15 houses throughout five countries in my lifetime. This was due to my father’s job in the military – moving every two to three years became the norm for us, so we often don’t stay in the same house for long.

Any vices?

Buying books, either digital or in print.

What single thing would most improve the quality of your life?

Living and running a small holding.

How do you relax?

Out riding my motorbike or rock climbing with my friends.

How would you like to be remembered?

If I am remembered fondly and with laughter, I know I will have done something right.

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